Evaluation of individual aspects of the exhibition:
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of the visitors stated that they knew more about the human body after their tour.

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said that it made them think more about life and death.

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felt “deep reverence” for the marvel of the human body.

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of the visitors reported that they appreciated their body more after having seen the exhibition.

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пleft the exhibition with valuable incentives for a healthier lifestyle.

Personal consequences resulting from the exhibition:
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of the respondents resolved to pay more attention to their physical health in future.

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of the respondents were more willing to donate organs after they had seen the exhibition.

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of the visitors could well imagine donating their body for plastination after death.

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stated that after having seen the exhibition they would agree more readily “that their dead body should be opened (autopsied) to determine the cause of death.”

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will continue to deal with the experience and insights they gained in the exhibitions for some time.

A follow-up survey among visitors in Vienna conducted six months after the end of the exhibition clearly indicated that a considerable share of visitors actually changed behavioral patterns according to their resolutions to lead a healthier life:
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followed a healthier diet since then.

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of the visitors stated that they had smoked less and consumed less alcohol.

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engaged in more sports activities.

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became more aware of their body.


Professor Ernst-D. Lantermann of the University of Kassel, Germany, developed this survey, conducted and valuated it in most of the cities.